Tag Archives: dental bonding

My Porcelain Crown Keeps Falling Off!

Hi there,

I was issued a same-day crown, which I thought would be fast and convienent, but in the year since I’ve gotten it, it has fallen out a handle of times!

I went to see a different dentist, who changed the setting of my crown, and gave me a zirconia crown. However, even this one has fallen out! He says that a different porcelain crown will stay in better.

Is this dentist right? Should I go to another dentist? Should I give CEREC another try? What should I do?

Nancy, from Trenton, New Jersey

 

Hi there Nancy,

When CEREC same-day crowns are done correctly, they will stay put permanently. CEREC crowns are made from a milled block of ceramic, but no matter what material you use to make a crown, it does not affect whether the crown will stay in.

There are two things that affect whether crowns will stay in. One this is the type of bonding used to cement the tooth into your mouth. The stronger the cement, the better the hold. The other factor is the shape of the tooth. The tooth needs a little bit of tapering to look natural, but the more taper done to the tooth, the harder it will be to bond it into your mouth. It is likely that your tooth was not tapered properly, which is why it keeps falling off.

You should go see a dentist in the area that specialized in crowns. It is very uncommon for crowns to fall out as many times as you have experienced.

This blog post is brought to you by Gilbert CEREC crown provider, Dr. Matthew Roper, of Vista Dorada Dental.

 

 

Is My CEREC Crown Causing My Sensitivity?

Hi,

My dentist recommended a CEREC crown to replace one of my teeth. This tooth has had issues to sensitivity to hot and cold, and I thought getting a crown would solve this problem. My dentist did not think I needed a root canal. However, after getting my CEREC crown, I’m still having a lot of sensitivity and discomfort. My dentist said to wait a month or so my mouth to get used to the crown. In the meantime, I’ve experienced sharp, throbbing jaw pain. I have had to medicate it with pain killers for a few weeks. I’ve had the crown for over a month, but it feels nothing like the other porcelain crowns I have. Am I correct in thinking the CEREC crown the source of my pain?  And what should I do?

Thank you,

Magnus, from Alberta, Canada

 

Hi Magnus,

Your issue is not likely caused by the CEREC crown, but rather the tooth itself. Tooth sensitivity to hot and cold is caused by irritation, and getting a crown can cause more irritation. Other options instead of a crown would include removing any current fillings or decay, and then filled the tooth with a bonding material to create a new core. If the new core did not reduce or eliminate the pain, then an x-ray and root canal may be needed.

CEREC crowns are more likely to fit better than traditional porcelain crowns, as they are milled by a computer based on a digital scan of your mouth. However, any crown you put over a sensitive tooth is unlikely to stop the issue.

When a tooth is infected, it will often feel worse before it feels better. If it suddenly starts to feel better, that means the pulp inside of your tooth has died, and a root canal is needed to clear it out.

Your best option is to get a second opinion about whether you need a root canal. You don’t need to go back to your same dentist who made the crown.

This blog is brought to you by Gilbert CEREC provider, Dr. Matthew Roper, of Vistadorada Dental.

What are CEREC crowns and are they best?

I haven’t visited the dentist like I should over the past ten years. Because I had a toothache,  I finally went. I knew my teeth weren’t in the best shape and the dentist told me I would need a tooth fixed with a root canal, along with some other cavities filled.  I don’t know if I was just overwhelmed by all the dentist was suggesting I needed done, but I swear he started talking another language. He started talking about getting a serk crown. I have looked on the internet and can’t find anything. Can you please translate? What is it and is it the best thing for a mouth like mine?

JB in Wyoming

Dear JB,

We are assuming, based on the work you need done, that your dentist was recommending getting a CEREC crown. There certainly are words that are dentist lingo and do require some translation and CEREC crowns fit that category as they are a newer treatment option.

What are CEREC crowns?

CEREC machineCerec crowns are porcelain crowns that a dentist can create in the office the same day as your visit for the root canal. The dentist uses computer technology and his expertise to make them. The dentist matches the shade of your teeth to the color of porcelain. Using the computer images of your tooth, a special machine cuts the porcelain to fit your tooth. It is bonded on once the root canal is finished.

As to whether it is best for your mouth, again we are just going by your brief history, but CEREC crowns created by dentists who know what they are doing can be very successful. If they are bonded well and you don’t grind your teeth, they will last as well as other crowns. The only time CEREC crowns aren’t usually preferred is when you need a crown on a front tooth. This is for esthetic reasons. They may not look as natural as other crowns created in a lab for the front teeth.

Since you have questions, it wouldn’t hurt to ask the dental office to see pictures of others who have had CEREC crowns placed or about the dentist’s experience.

This post is sponsored by Vista Dorada Dental in Gilbert, AZ.

 

Can I whiten a bonded area on my tooth?

I had a little black space near my gums covered with dental bonding a few weeks ago. I love having that space filled because I really self-conscious about it. It looks like my bonding is turning yellow, though. My husband says it’s not, but I swear it’s more yellow than it was when I got it put on. I typically brush with baking soda and that’s not helping.  I have a tooth whitening tray from my dentist a year ago. Should I try it on my bonding?

Amelia, Four Corners area

Amelia,

Baking soda is not your best option on dental bonding or porcelain veneers. It is very abrasive and can cause damage to the glaze on the bonding or veneers. The baking soda may be what has made your bonding turn yellow. If the polish has been compromised, that area may be more susceptible to stains from food or drinks, such as berries, coffee, or tea.

The problem could just be the bonding material itself.  If your dentist wasn’t experienced in cosmetic dentistry, there’s a chance that the materials he used weren’t quality materials. It may have caused the area to yellow.

How do I fix my yellowed bonding?

As you said you had this bonding done a few weeks ago, you should return to your dentist and ask about the coloration of your bonding.  Ask if they can repolish that area. Unfortunately, as with porcelain veneers, no whitening will work. Actually, with bonding, whitening can actually make that area look worse because it will whiten the tooth around the bonding and leave the bonded area the color it is.

If you can resolve the coloring issue with your bonding with your dentist, look for a specialty toothpaste designed specifically for bonded areas or porcelain veneers, such as Supersmile toothpaste. If your dentist can’t remedy this, you may need to see another cosmetic dentist. That area may not need to be completely redone, but may be corrected with just better materials.

This post is sponsored by Vista Dorada Dental in Gilbert, AZ.

 

A more affordable treatment

I am looking for ways to make my dental care more affordable and I was wondering if dental bonding will save me money over porcelain veneers?

My teeth are very yellow even though I brush my teeth after every meal. It seems that you can see through the ends of my two front teeth. I’m unhappy with my smile but I don’t want it to look fake.

After the research I’ve done, I don’t think I want to have porcelain veneers done. They seem like they may not look natural and they are extremely expensive. I guess I’m wondering if simply whitening my teeth will work or if tooth bonding is a better choice for me. Or maybe I should get the bleaching done first and then the bonding? I don’t want to spend a lot of money and then have my teeth turn yellow again either. Can you explain how bonding works and let me know your thoughts.

Thanks,

– Tanya from Florida

Tanya,

After hearing your case, I don’t think dental bonding is the alternative that is right for you just because you are looking to save money on porcelain veneers. Teeth whitening sounds like the best solution from what you have described. This is because good dental bonding will end up costing almost as much as veneers and it won’t last as long. In fact it would probably only last about one-tenth as long as veneers.

Teeth bleaching will take care of the yellow color of your teeth and they will not return to their original color. Your teeth will pick up stains as time passes, but you can always do some touch up bleaching to keep your white new smile.

This post is sponsored by Glibert dentist Vista Dorada Dental.

Related link: affordable dentistry

Will Snap-On Smile work for my daughter?

My daughter is ten years old and she chipped her front teeth. I was thinking I would wait until she is older before I get these teeth fixed. But I was wondering if Snap-On Smile would work until we moved forward with a permanent fix?

Thanks,

– Gina from Ohio

Gina,

Ten years old is a tricky age because your daughter likely has a mix of permanent teeth and she probably still has some baby teeth. The baby teeth she still has may be a little loose too and her permanent teeth are in the process of erupting. The main issue with choosing the Snap-On Smile for your daughter is the fact that the appliance needs to snap onto her existing teeth. And since her teeth are in such a transitional stage, it isn’t going to work very well.

Dental bonding is safe for children and would be a solution to take care of the chipped teeth. You just need to make sure that she is old enough and willing to sit in a dental chair during the procedure.

This post is sponsored by Gilbert dentist Vista Dorada Dental.

Related posts: pediatric dentist

Will Snap-On Smile work for my son?

Hello,

My son is eight years old and he has chipped his tooth pretty badly. It’s almost broken in half. The dentist filled it, but it broke within a week. It doesn’t seem to hurt him since the roots are unharmed. We’ve been told that he isn’t old enough to have his tooth capped. Will the Snap-On Smile work for him?

– Maya from Indiana

Maya,
Snap-On Smile works well to temporarily give the appearance of a straight, white smile. In the particular case of your son, I’m not sure this is the way to go.

If his tooth is broken, then placing this Snap-On Smile appliance over his tooth is doing nothing to address the real problem. Direct dental bonding with porcelain or composite materials can fix this problem for your son. And it needs to be done correctly so that it does not interfere with his biting or chewing. Although, you will need to seek the talents of a true cosmetic dentist. Not just any family dentist will be able to do this kind of work well.

There are some other issues to choosing Snap-On Smile for your son. Not only will it feel bulky, a boy his age may lose it. Also, he has a combination of permanent and baby teeth. This means that fitting the appliance correctly will be difficult since his bite is changing so rapidly. The appliance itself may also get in the way of new teeth that are erupting.

The reason the repair you mentioned failed is likely due to the fact that it got in the way of his bite. When he is a bit older, he will have all his permanent teeth and this will be less of an issue. It is difficult to make anymore recommendations without actually seeing this particular case. Therefore, I highly recommend consulting with an expert cosmetic dentist to present your options to you.

The tooth will look and function normally if it is done correctly.

Best of luck to you.

This post is sponsored by Gilbert dentist Vista Dorada Dental.

Related link: emergency dentist

Will my daughter’s splotched teeth be covered with insurance?

Hello,

My daughter recently had her braces off and now her teeth have splotches on them. She was born with less than normal tooth enamel. So I was wondering if my dental insurance will pay for this?

Thanks,

– Teri in Nebraska

Teri,

If her teeth didn’t have the splotches before braces, then the damage is probably due to a lack of good brushing while the braces were in place. When you wear braces it is good to keep a toothbrush with you at all times because of the importance of keeping your teeth clean after every meal. Otherwise, the enamel can become damaged.

Since you mentioned that your daughter’s tooth enamel was damaged before braces then your dental insurance should be under some obligation.

Although, the insurance carrier is only liable to repair physical damage to the teeth. So I wouldn’t think of it as them covering it, because that usually means they will pay for the whole procedure. It is much more likely that they will help you pay for the repair to your daughter’s teeth. Your insurance is only committed to making the repair functionally sound. And my guess is you want the teeth to look beautiful in addition to being functional.

For beautiful results, you need an expert cosmetic dentist. Not just any family, general dentist will be able to do this kind of cosmetic work well. Cosmetic dentistry requires extensive training beyond dental school. It may be more expensive to get the results you want but when done well, it will be well worth it.

Dental bonding or porcelain veneers are options that would work to repair the splotches.

I hope this information was helpful.

This post is sponsored by Gilbert dentist Vista Dorada Dental.

Related link: Lumineers, Invisalign

My child’s broken tooth

I feel so bad for my nine year old daughter. Yesterday, she fell down and broke one of her front teeth. Also, I just noticed a horizontal crack in another one. When I took her to the dentist, they didn’t seem concerned. Basically I was told that he doesn’t have the availability right now to take care of it. He said it should be fine for three months and needs that time to desensitize. Have you heard of this waiting period? I really want her to have it fixed as soon as possible.

Thanks for your time.

– Kendra from Arizona

Kendra,

If it is your desire to have this taken care of immediately, there is really no reason to wait. It would be ideal if you still have the broken piece of the tooth. If you find a cosmetic dentist that has an artistic eye, the tooth will actually be able to be reattached.

Please do your homework though and don’t go to just any dentist. Make sure the dentist is passionate about cosmetic dentistry and has undergone the additional training beyond dental school. From what you have described, the location of your daughter’s tooth is quite prominent and it will be important the the dentist is experienced.

Dental bonding will work to restore the look of the tooth if you don’t have the piece that has come off. As time goes by and your daughter gets older, the pulp in the tooth will be smaller. At that time, a single crown may be more appropriate based on damage that has been done.

Best of luck!

This post is sponsored by Gilbert dentist Vista Dorada Dental.

Related links: emergency dentist, pediatric dentist

I want to fix my teeth spacing

There is some spacing between my teeth that I have never liked it. The truth is that I cannot afford cosmetic dentistry. It is just too expensive for me. Do you know of anything that can be done that is a quick fix to make my teeth look straight?

– Billy from Iowa

Billy,

There is an appliance called the Snap-On Smile that may work for your situation. This is an inexpensive way to temporarily fix your tooth spacing.

All that is required is for the dentist to take a simple impression of your teeth and select the shade and smile design you want. Then it’s sent off to the lab for them to create it.

It simply snaps into place over your existing teeth giving the illusion of straight, white teeth. You can expect it to last for approximately three to five years if you take care of it and the cost is in the $1000-$1500 range. This is significantly less expensive than porcelain veneers which run about that same amount for the cost of one veneer.

You may also be interested in dental bonding, which is another less expensive way to fix your tooth spacing. This all depends on how many and how large your spaces are. With this treatment, a tooth-colored composite is applied to the ends of your teeth and then it is shaped to mimic the natural look of your tooth to fill in the gaps. It is important that you visit an expert cosmetic dentist for this type of work. Lastly, tooth bonding will last much longer than a Snap-On Smile.

This post is sponsored by Gilbert dentist Vista Dorada Dental.