Tag Archives: jaw pain

Is My CEREC Crown Causing My Sensitivity?

Hi,

My dentist recommended a CEREC crown to replace one of my teeth. This tooth has had issues to sensitivity to hot and cold, and I thought getting a crown would solve this problem. My dentist did not think I needed a root canal. However, after getting my CEREC crown, I’m still having a lot of sensitivity and discomfort. My dentist said to wait a month or so my mouth to get used to the crown. In the meantime, I’ve experienced sharp, throbbing jaw pain. I have had to medicate it with pain killers for a few weeks. I’ve had the crown for over a month, but it feels nothing like the other porcelain crowns I have. Am I correct in thinking the CEREC crown the source of my pain?  And what should I do?

Thank you,

Magnus, from Alberta, Canada

 

Hi Magnus,

Your issue is not likely caused by the CEREC crown, but rather the tooth itself. Tooth sensitivity to hot and cold is caused by irritation, and getting a crown can cause more irritation. Other options instead of a crown would include removing any current fillings or decay, and then filled the tooth with a bonding material to create a new core. If the new core did not reduce or eliminate the pain, then an x-ray and root canal may be needed.

CEREC crowns are more likely to fit better than traditional porcelain crowns, as they are milled by a computer based on a digital scan of your mouth. However, any crown you put over a sensitive tooth is unlikely to stop the issue.

When a tooth is infected, it will often feel worse before it feels better. If it suddenly starts to feel better, that means the pulp inside of your tooth has died, and a root canal is needed to clear it out.

Your best option is to get a second opinion about whether you need a root canal. You don’t need to go back to your same dentist who made the crown.

This blog is brought to you by Gilbert CEREC provider, Dr. Matthew Roper, of Vistadorada Dental.

Should I see an emergency dentist if my jaw hurts?

My jaw has been popping for a long time. Sometimes it also seems to need to open at an angle or to the side a little, not just straight down.  I don’t know why, but now whenever I open my jaw wide, it’s like it is grinding. This week it has started to hurt and I wonder if I have dislocated my jaw. Should I see an emergency dentist?

Cynthia, Columbus, OH

Dear Cynthia,

Jaw pain from TMDFrom the list of your symptoms, you may be suffering from Temporomandibular Disorder, or TMD. Sometimes this is also know as TMJ and includes a number of problems associated with the jaw. Some patients with TMD just feel uncomfortable and others experience severe pain.

Symptoms of TMD

When you do suffer from TMD, you may experience that grinding sound, also known as Crepitus. That occurs when you have bone grinding on bone. You may also experience headaches, clicking sounds, restricted motion, and/or pain. You may be further on the spectrum, but unless your jaw is locked closed and your jaw can’t be manipulated open, it probably doesn’t warrant a trip to the emergency dentist.

There are several factors  that can affect TMD. If you grind your teeth at night or clench your jaw, especially if you are stressed, it can aggrevate it. Your jaw can be affected if your bite is off. Arthritis may play a part. There are many reasons why your joint hurts or the muscles around that joint aren’t working well together.

To help ease your discomfort associated with TMD, you can use a moist heating pad on your jaw for 20 minutes a day. If you know you are stressed and it is making your symptoms worse, try to find ways to alleviate it. This may include exercise, meditation, relaxation techniques–whatever works for you. Also, avoid chewing gum and clenching your teeth.

Because TMD can get worse if left unchecked, you will want to see a dentist who is experienced in TMD.  You will most likely be given an appliance to help you with your symptoms.

This post is sponsored by Vista Dorada Dental in Gilbert, AZ.

Will CEREC Crowns Hold Up as Well as Regular Crowns If I Grind?

My dentist just got a CEREC machine and wants me to get one for my new cavity. I’m a little concerned it won’t hold up as well as regular crowns. I tend to grind my teeth at night. Is he wanting me to get these just to try out his machine or are they legitimately strong? I don’t want to waste money.

Greg L.

Dear Greg,

Gilbert CEREC Crown

Both CEREC crowns and traditional crowns are equally strong. The biggest difference is one is milled by computer and can be completed during your appointment instead of having to be sent out to a lab to be completed. This eliminates the need for a second appointment or a temporary crown.

However, if you are a teeth grinder that needs to be addressed right away. Your crowns, whether traditional or CEREC, will not hold up to the stress the grinding places on them. Truthfully, neither will your natural teeth. It’s likely the reason you’ve had to have so many dental crowns to begin with.

Not only does teeth grinding wear down your enamel which leaves your teeth vulnerable to both decay and cracking, it also will cause jaw pain, headaches, and eventually TMJ. That can become serious.

I’m very surprised your dentist hasn’t recommended a night guard to protect your teeth. As soon as your crown is completed, you need to be fit for a custom nightguard. You won’t be able to stop grinding your teeth, especially if you do it mostly in your sleep. However, the nightguard protects them from the stress of the grinding.

After that, a well made dental crown can last upwards of 15 years.

This blog is brought to you by Dr. Matt Roper.