Category Archives: CEREC crowns

Is My Pain Caused by my CEREC Crown?

Hello there,

I had three CEREC crowns done on my back teeth recently. I was pleased with how convenient getting the CEREC crowns was, but since then, I’ve had a lot of pain when chewing. Eating anything crunchy or chewy causing a bolt of pain, as though a nerve is exposed or something. My dentist has shaved down some of the crown. He says the pain I feel is from how I grind my food when I chew. Is that the case? I’ve tried being more careful when I eat, but the pain I feel makes me nervous during meals.

Richard from Amityville, New York

 

Dear Richard,

There are a few reasons that can cause a new crown to hurt. One reason may be that the crown is too high, so the rest of your teeth hit it first when you bite into something. The second reason is that the tooth under the crown may be infected. The infection can cause inflammation in the jaw, causing constant jolts of pain when biting or chewing.

Your pain is unlikely to be caused by how you chew your food, as you did not have this problem prior to the crown. Also, CEREC crowns are supposed to fit exactly to your mouth’s specifications, as they are milled to fit your teeth precisely.

Since your dentist has tried to grind down the crown, your pain is not likely to be caused by hitting too high on the crown. You will need to find out if you have an infection, and where it is in your mouth. An X-ray will be needed, and you may want to seek a second opinion if you do not trust your current dentist’s skills.

This blog post is brought to you by Gilbert CEREC crown provider, Dr. Matt Roper, of Vista Dorada Dental.

 

 

Is My CEREC Crown Causing My Sensitivity?

Hi,

My dentist recommended a CEREC crown to replace one of my teeth. This tooth has had issues to sensitivity to hot and cold, and I thought getting a crown would solve this problem. My dentist did not think I needed a root canal. However, after getting my CEREC crown, I’m still having a lot of sensitivity and discomfort. My dentist said to wait a month or so my mouth to get used to the crown. In the meantime, I’ve experienced sharp, throbbing jaw pain. I have had to medicate it with pain killers for a few weeks. I’ve had the crown for over a month, but it feels nothing like the other porcelain crowns I have. Am I correct in thinking the CEREC crown the source of my pain?  And what should I do?

Thank you,

Magnus, from Alberta, Canada

 

Hi Magnus,

Your issue is not likely caused by the CEREC crown, but rather the tooth itself. Tooth sensitivity to hot and cold is caused by irritation, and getting a crown can cause more irritation. Other options instead of a crown would include removing any current fillings or decay, and then filled the tooth with a bonding material to create a new core. If the new core did not reduce or eliminate the pain, then an x-ray and root canal may be needed.

CEREC crowns are more likely to fit better than traditional porcelain crowns, as they are milled by a computer based on a digital scan of your mouth. However, any crown you put over a sensitive tooth is unlikely to stop the issue.

When a tooth is infected, it will often feel worse before it feels better. If it suddenly starts to feel better, that means the pulp inside of your tooth has died, and a root canal is needed to clear it out.

Your best option is to get a second opinion about whether you need a root canal. You don’t need to go back to your same dentist who made the crown.

This blog is brought to you by Gilbert CEREC provider, Dr. Matthew Roper, of Vistadorada Dental.

My CEREC Crown Doesn’t Feel Right

Hello,
I recently broke one of my crowns. I wanted to get it replaced ASAP, so I opted for a same-day CEREC crown.

My new CEREC crown feels too thick and doesn’t fit right.  Even after my dentist filed it down, it still isn’t fitting properly. None of my other crowns ever felt like this. I don’t think it’s going to get any better. I thought CEREC was the way to go, but now I’m regretting getting one. Is my crown salvageable? Or should I scrap it?

Thank you,

-Adrian, Tallahassee, Florida

Hi Adrian,

Thank you for your message. Unfortunately, it sounds like your dentist just wasn’t that comfortable using the CEREC software; if they had been, your problem should have been avoided. CEREC crowns are made using a high-tech machine. This machine’s software scans the tooth prior to milling the crown from ceramic. The result is a strong, long-lasting ceramic crown, so it’s disappointing to hear you had such a bad experience.

Even without using your previous crown or original tooth as a baseline, your dentist should have been able to properly guide the machine to create a crown contoured to your gums. If the crown doesn’t fit right at the gum line, food can get trapped underneath it, and that can lead to gum disease.

Crowns are designed to fit so seamlessly in your gums that you would not notice them. Ill-fitting crowns can cause you to bite your lip, cheeks, or tongue, especially while you sleep. Aside from being painful and annoying, this biting and chewing could lead to the growth of a tumor.

I’m glad you tried to take care of this problem, as it can become more serious. However, now that the crown is cemented in your mouth, it is likely too late to salvage it. Your best bet is to ask your dentist to remove the crown. If you want another CEREC crown, find a more experienced cosmetic dentist. Otherwise, have your dentist send the crown to a dental lab to be remade. A new, properly-fitting crown will feel so much better than what you have now.

This blog post is brought to you by Gilbert CEREC crown provider, Dr. Matthew Roper.

What is a cerec crown?

If you are in need of a crown, but haven’t considered a CEREC crown, or are unsure of what they are, it’s important to take time to understand the science behind them, and why they are exceptional.

What is a CEREC Crown?

Many dental offices have technology which enables them to provide “computer-assisted design-computer-assisted manufacture”, or CAD-CAM crowns. CEREC is the company that is most known for this technology. This type of crown is created by a computer to perfectly fit your tooth, which prevents the need for the lab involvement in manufacturing the crown.

This technology allows the all-ceramic crown to be made while you wait, thus there is no need for a second appointment or temporary crown.

Facts About CEREC Crowns

  1. No single brand of same-day crowns. Though many people ask for same-day crowns by asking for CEREC crowns, this is an brand of same-day crowns, similar to Zoom Whitening, which is a brand of teeth whitening, but there is not a single brand of teeth whitening. CEREC means “Chairside Economical Restoration of Esthetic Ceramics”, but is not the only brand of same-day crowns. Often, the brand will use the phrase “same-day crowns”, or “crowns-in-day,” but these phrases are part of the marketing for the brand. However, the overall idea is the same with all restorations which take place in one dental visit. The office uses CAD/CAM technology to create it.
  2. CEREC crowns are billed the same as traditional crowns. Many people think the CEREC crown costs more than a traditional one. However, the opposite is true. For billing purposes, all dental procedures have billing codes. The billing code is the same for a CEREC crown and a traditional crown, therefore they cannot be billed any differently.
  3. They’re high-tech. CAD/CAM means a computer assists in the design. The program takes a picture of your mouth and plots out every detail. The measurements are exact. Then, the crowns are carved out by a machine in the office, with each new tooth starting out as a piece of material, oftentimes composite, zirconia, ceramic, or acrylic polymer, which is the same base for traditional crowns.

When operated and placed by an experienced cosmetic dentist, CAD/CAM crowns are a quick and efficient way to improve your smile, while maintaining a natural look and feel.

This article is provided by the office of Gilbert CEREC Crown provider, Dr. Matthew Roper.\


My crown keeps falling off

I had a CEREC crown placed. However, it has come out several times within the last year. Finally, after the fourth time, I consulted a different dentist, who replaced the crown with a zirconia porcelain crown, but it, too, has come out several times. The dentist suggested a full porcelain crown, stating that the cement is adhering to my tooth, but not the crown. He indicated that the all-porcelain crown is rough of the underneath and would, therefore, bond to the cement more effectively. I’m unsure of what my next step should be, but I am tired of the trouble these crowns have caused. What do you suggest I do?

Thank you,
Kodi

Kodi,

The CEREC crown, or same-day crown, is created by a computer in the dental office, the day of your appointment. When prepared and adhesed correctly, the crown will remain permanently affixed to the tooth. The material of which your crown is made is not indicative of how permanent the bond will be. Whether your crown is porcelain, gold, CEREC, or zirconia, all are made to stay permanently.

However, there are two factors that can determine if a crown will stay on permanently or not. They are the bonding strength of the cement, and the shape of the prepared tooth. The most important of these is the shape. If the tooth is prepared with little taper, a crown can be adhered with a weak cement, and it will stay permanently affixed. However, if there is a lot of taper, even some of the strongest cements will have difficulty staying on.

This is not implying that getting a solid bond between the crown and tooth would not solve your problem. The cement’s strength is important. But, when a tooth is prepared with good retention form, the crown will not fall off multiple times in one year. This indicates that your tooth may have been prepared with retention form that is insufficient.

To move forward, it would be a good idea to consult a dentist experienced in placing crowns that will stay on.

This article was brought to you by Gilbert CEREC Crown provider, Dr. Matthew Roper.

CEREC Crowns help with dental anxiety

If you are a person who suffers from dental anxiety, and haven’t visited a dentist in quite some time, you may not be aware of CEREC crowns, and how these restorations are are changing dentistry and lives.

CEREC crowns are made in the office

It used to be that a crown could only be done by going into the office for multiple visits. The doctor would removed the decay and/or damage, take impressions, and fit you for a temporary crown in the first visit. Your impressions would then be sent to a dental lab, where your restoration would be created, over a two-week timeframe. While some crowns remain this way, CEREC crowns are different.

Years ago, the only option when you needed to have a crown done was to go into the office for two visits. On the first visit, the doctor would remove the decay or damage on the tooth, build it up if need be, take impressions, and fit you with a temporary. Then, your impressions would get shipped off to a dental lab which would then craft your restoration over a period of two weeks. Some crowns are still this way, but CEREC crowns are different. These crowns are made in the office using CAD/CAM technology and a milling machine, allowing your crown to be created and placed all in one visit, easing the anxiety of a dental patient who may be troubled by the idea of multiple visits to the dental office.

Impressions are taken digitally

Often, people with dental anxiety have strong gag reflexes, or aversions to the impression process. The use of the CAD/CAM technology, allows the impressions to be taken digitally, similar to having a photo taken.

Can be combined with sedation dentistry

Nitrous oxide is a helpful way for patients with mild dental anxiety to feel more relaxed and comfortable. It takes effect quickly, and wears off almost immediately after treatment. For those patients with a more intense dental anxiety, conscious sedation will place you in a deeply relaxed state.

This blog is sponsored by Gilbert CEREC crowns dentist, Dr. Matthew Roper.

 

 

What should I do if my CEREC crown broke?

Two weeks ago, I had a CEREC crown done. I was recently eating, when I felt something come loose in my mouth. I came to find out this crown had broken in half. The dentist offered to fix the crown free of charge. While I was thankful for this, I wanted to know why this happened. I want to be sure this was just a fluke circumstance and not an error made by the dentist.

Sincerely,
Randi

Dear Randi,

While this is quite rare, there are some things that may have hinted that something was “off”, like tooth pain, jaw pain, or if the tooth was connecting first when you bit down.

Another possibility is the way the material handled stress, though it is unlikely that this is the case. However, if this were the case, it is possible there was some sort of defect in the material before use, though this, too, is unlikely.

Another thought is if you grind or clench your teeth, this may be the cause. Each tooth has a different threshold in terms of the amount of force it can withstand. This is why some restorations my break, while others do not. If this occurs during the day, practicing relaxation exercises can help. If it’s taking place at night, a night guard will prevent the grinding.

The majority of crowns can handle this to an extent, so you can’t rule out the material used or a mistake made by the dentist. It’s worth having him redo the procedure. It would be good to see what he thinks is the cause. Dentists have restorations fail from time to time. So long as this is not the norm, and he wants to fix the issue, it sounds like you’re in good hands.

This post is brought to you by Gilbert CEREC provider Dr. Matt Roper.

What are CEREC crowns and are they best?

I haven’t visited the dentist like I should over the past ten years. Because I had a toothache,  I finally went. I knew my teeth weren’t in the best shape and the dentist told me I would need a tooth fixed with a root canal, along with some other cavities filled.  I don’t know if I was just overwhelmed by all the dentist was suggesting I needed done, but I swear he started talking another language. He started talking about getting a serk crown. I have looked on the internet and can’t find anything. Can you please translate? What is it and is it the best thing for a mouth like mine?

JB in Wyoming

Dear JB,

We are assuming, based on the work you need done, that your dentist was recommending getting a CEREC crown. There certainly are words that are dentist lingo and do require some translation and CEREC crowns fit that category as they are a newer treatment option.

What are CEREC crowns?

CEREC machineCerec crowns are porcelain crowns that a dentist can create in the office the same day as your visit for the root canal. The dentist uses computer technology and his expertise to make them. The dentist matches the shade of your teeth to the color of porcelain. Using the computer images of your tooth, a special machine cuts the porcelain to fit your tooth. It is bonded on once the root canal is finished.

As to whether it is best for your mouth, again we are just going by your brief history, but CEREC crowns created by dentists who know what they are doing can be very successful. If they are bonded well and you don’t grind your teeth, they will last as well as other crowns. The only time CEREC crowns aren’t usually preferred is when you need a crown on a front tooth. This is for esthetic reasons. They may not look as natural as other crowns created in a lab for the front teeth.

Since you have questions, it wouldn’t hurt to ask the dental office to see pictures of others who have had CEREC crowns placed or about the dentist’s experience.

This post is sponsored by Vista Dorada Dental in Gilbert, AZ.

 

Are CEREC Crowns as Reliable as Regular Crowns?

At my last check-up, my dentist said I need three crowns. I wasn’t too surprised I needed them, but he’s pretty insistent I get CEREC crowns. My insurance doesn’t cover those and they’re more expensive. I’m not sure I want to invest in something more expensive just because it’s the newest thing unless I know it’s as reliable as the regular crowns. Do you have an opinion on this?

Louis A.

Dear Louis,

A CEREC Machine
When Should You Get a CEREC Crown?

A lot of whether or not a dental crown is reliable depends more on the dentist than anything else. Some dentists get better results than others. However, there are times when a CEREC crown is better than a traditional one. There are times it’s the other way around as well.

Because they’re computer milled, CEREC crowns often fit better. They do well in front and side teeth, but aren’t always strong enough for back teeth. For those, you may prefer a zirconia crown or a porcelain fused to metal crown.

Their biggest benefit is you can have your three crowns done in one visit, without a temporary crown. Other than that, everything else truly depends on the skill of your dentist.

If you decide you want a CEREC crown, your dentist can bill the insurance for the regular crown and you just pay the difference, which isn’t too substantial.

Some Considerations with CEREC Crowns

Placement is the biggest issue. If it’s going to be visible and you’ve ever wanted to whiten your teeth do the teeth whitening before you have the crown milled. If it’s a visible side tooth, that should be sufficient for an attractive looking smile.

However, if it’s a front tooth, you’ll want a traditional crown. CEREC crowns are milled out of a single block of porcelain which, though beautiful does not have all the subtleties necessary for a front tooth. You’ll want something sculpted from various blocks so that the right level of translucency comes across at the appropriate parts of the tooth. Otherwise, it can look a little flat compared to the tooth next to it. You’ll know it’s a little different without knowing why. It will still be attractive, just not as attractive as it could have been.

Again, each dentist’s skills vary in this area, so ask to see sample before and after pictures of their work.

This blog is brought to you by Dr. Matt Roper.

CEREC Crown Disaster

Everything I’ve read about CEREC crowns and their procedure leads me to think my dentist was way off on how she handled my particular case. What’s done is done, but I just need to make sure the sensitivity I’m feeling is normal and will go away after some healing or if I have a problem. When the dentist did my crown, she said my tooth was in too bad a shape to get a good image so she was just going to pull one from a CEREC database. I wasn’t too worried because the advertisements all talk about how perfectly these crowns fit. Well, it didn’t. It was too big all around. She spent well over an hour grinding down all the sides of it. Not only was that remarkably uncomfortable, but it doesn’t even look like a real tooth anymore. It looks more like a box. Plus, every time I eat or drink something cold it zings me. Will that end after a period of time or do I have a problem on my hands?

Dirk B.

Dear Dirk,

Gilbert CEREC Crowns
A CEREC Machine

You have a problem. You’re also right that this seems to be a disaster. CEREC crowns should be able to be placed in minutes. I have no idea what your dentist meant by your tooth was in too bad a shape to get a good image. It’s only teeth which are in bad shape that need a dental crown to begin with. I have no idea why she couldn’t get a clear image.

The only thing I can think of with an image database is when she input into the CEREC machine which tooth she was going to crown. It will give her a basic image to work from, then she’ll put images of the surrounding and opposing teeth so the computer can design a crown with a perfect fit. It sounds like your dentist had absolutely no idea what she was doing.

Get a New CEREC Crown

The sensitivity to cold concerns me. It sounds like your dentist left an open margin. That not only causes some pain when you drink something cold, but it also allows food and drinks to get trapped in there. You don’t want to leave any opening for decay. A mistake like this can cost you your tooth. Then, you won’t be trying to get a crown, but a complete tooth replacement.

You need to get a new CEREC crown made. But, you’ll want to go about this in a way that won’t cost you any more money. You’ll first need to get a second opinion from a dentist verifying everything I’ve said so you have ammunition. Do NOT tell the second opinion dentist the story you told me. Just tell them you want them to look at your crown. Also, do NOT tell them who your dentist is. You don’t want any friendship or misplaced sense of loyalty to cause them to waver in their true opinion. If they pressure you to know, tell them you’ll let them know AFTER they give their opinion. Tell them you just want their pure, untainted thoughts.

Once what I suspect is confirmed, don’t just ask for a refund. Your dentist should also pay for any expenses you incur to fix her botched job.

I hope this helps.
This blog is brought to you by Dr. Matt Roper.