Category Archives: CEREC crowns

CEREC Crown Hurts

I had a CEREC crown done on a tooth. This isn’t my first crown, but it is my first CEREC crown. For some reason, this one hurts when I bite down. Is that something peculiar to this type of crown? I’ve never had that happen before?

Jeff

Dear Jeff,

Man in pain, grabbing his cheek in need of emergency dental care.

I truly do not believe the pain you are experiencing is because it is a CEREC crown. Most of the time, CEREC crowns fit better because they are precisely milled by a computer. So, what COULD be causing your pain?

The first reason could be that the bite is too high. If it isn’t seated in the correct place, then when you bite down all your biting force is going to that one spot instead of being spread across all your teeth. This can cause some substantial pain. If this is the case, your dentist can adjust the crown and you should have no further problems.

You didn’t mention if you’d already been back to your dentist and this has been done. If the crown has been adjusted and you are still experiencing pain, the next step would be to check for a lingering infection. If you had this crown placed after a root canal treatment, there can be a canal that was missed. Though our teeth only have a limited number of canals, many times they have branches that shoot off into other parts of the tooth. A dentist can do everything right and still not be able to get everything the first go-round. In that case, a re-treatment can be tried. If you do need a re-treatment, I generally recommend you see a root canal specialist to increase your chances of success the second time around.

Even if you didn’t have a root canal treatment, there could still have been an infection there. Sometimes, the infections are small and hard to read, but get easier as the infection grows. A simple diagnostic x-ray should help determine if this is the cause of your pain.

I would start with these two avenues of inquiry as they are the most common.

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CEREC Crown Disaster

I was told getting a CEREC crown would be a snap and fit better than other crowns. Not only was I in the chair for over three hours, but the crown didn’t fit properly. She said it was because my tooth was in really bad shape so she had to take a general model from the database. It doesn’t fit at all like my normal teeth or even my other crowns. In fact, she had to grind it down because it didn’t fit in properly. Now it hurts. What do I do?

Carol

Dear Carol,

porcelain block for CEREC crowns

Something is wrong here. Let’s start with your dentist’s statement that she had to use a general model from the database. Her reasoning that the tooth was in too bad of shape doesn’t make much sense to me. Of course the tooth was in bad shape. That is the whole point of needing a dental crown! Why would you put a crown on a healthy intact tooth?

CEREC crowns should fit better than other crowns because they are designed and milled using precision software. However, computer software is only as good as the person programming it. Though, this software is pretty user friendly. For instance, let’s say you were missing your lower left molar. Your dentist would program that in and the software would give her a basic shape to use for that type of tooth to start the design. From there, images of your surrounding and opposing teeth give her the remainder of the information she needs to input into the software. Then it designs the crown.

Your crown is uncomfortable and she had to do grinding on the tooth, so clearly this didn’t happen properly. There are so many things that can go wrong with a dental crown. Here are just three:

  • Open margins. If the crown does not fit the tooth perfectly around the complete circumference of the tooth, then you will have a gap where bacteria can get in leading to decay under your crown.
  • Bite Design. When a bite isn’t designed properly, it throws off occlusion and you will end up with painful TMJ Disorder issues.
  • Poor Contouring. If the tooth is not contoured properly, you will have gum inflammation, which will lead to gum disease.

What this boils down to is you need to have this tooth looked at by another dentist. If they can tell you what is wrong with it, you can get either ask her to re-do the crown or ask for a refund and have it redone by another dentist.

This blog is brought to you by Gilbert Dentist Dr. Matt Roper.
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CEREC Crowns on Front Teeth

I need to get a dental crown on a front tooth, but my dentist doesn’t want to provide it. He insists I won’t like it. Yet, he offers CEREC crowns. It doesn’t make sense to me. Why does he have the machine? Should I go to a different dentist to have it done?

Alan

Dear Alan,

Close up of front teeth

My guess is your dentist uses the CEREC crowns on teeth other than the front two teeth. There is a reason for this. When a CEREC crown is made, it is milled out of a single block of porcelain. This does fine on other teeth. However, if you look closely at the teeth above you’ll notice the teeth aren’t uniform from top to bottom. There are differences in opacity. When you get a traditional porcelain crown, which your dentist is suggesting, it is formed from several different blocks of porcelain in order to mimic those differences.

So, you have a few choices. You can go to a dentist who cares less about how the results will turn out and more about bringing in the fee from a patient in order to get the same-day crowns. Or you can listen to your dentist and allow him to do the traditional crowns.

It is your teeth and your smile. So, if having the best result isn’t as important to you as the convenience of one appointment, which is totally fine, then I would switch to another dentist to get the crown you want. You could also tell your dentist you understand it won’t look as good, but you still want CEREC and would prefer he get the fee than another dentist. Then, he may go ahead with it.

This blog is brought to you by Gilbert Dentist Dr. Matt Roper.

CEREC Crowns Doesn’t Fit

I thought CEREC crowns were supposed to be more accurate because they are milled by a computer. I had a four-year-old crown break so I needed to get another one. I was in a hurry and my dentist just got the CEREC machine that is supposed to create your crown in one appointment. When I got the crown it was way too bulky. I came in again and she could see it was too big in spots. While she did grind it down in some of those spots, I am biting my tongue now every time I eat. Is this technology not what she painted it to be or is something else going on?

Mark

Dear Mark,

porcelain block for CEREC crowns

I think the problem here is more your dentist than the CEREC technology. First, she provided you with a dental crown that broke after just four years. They shouldn’t break, especially when they’re that “young”. That by itself tells me she struggles with some basic dental skills.

Now she has this great new technology. Normally, when you are preparing a crown with the CEREC machine, it is basing it off of a tooth that is already there and has been scanned into the program. Because your tooth already had a dental crown and now that was broken and gone, there wasn’t a previous tooth for her to base the crown on.

That being said, the software has the ability for the dentist to design a crown for a tooth that is no longer there. It’s fairly easy to shape the tooth using the software. The problem is she doesn’t know how to do that yet.

You have a couple of options here. The crown needs to be replaced. It also needs to fit so perfectly you don’t even know it is there. Nor, should you bite your tongue because of its fit. You can either have her provide you a traditional crown that is made in a laboratory, but again, I’m concerned that the last one only lasted four years.

Alternatively, you could just ask for a refund and go somewhere else to get your crown done. You may want to do this to make sure you get the right crown.

This blog is brought to you by Gilbert Dentist Dr. Matt Roper. We’re open Saturdays.

Help! My Crown Keeps Coming Out!

Hi there,

Last year, I had a same-day CEREC crown done on one of my teeth. I was happy with it at first, but since then, it has fallen out several times. Each time I go back to the dentist to get it fixed, but it always falls out again. Finally, I went to a different cosmetic dentist. He replaced the setting for the crown, and said that I should get a new all-porcelain crown, as it would stick to the cement better. I just want my tooth to stay put, like it’s supposed to. I’m not sure what else I can do.

Nephenee, from South Carolina

 

Hi Nephenee,

No matter what material your CEREC crown was made from, it will stay permanently once properly placed and bonded. Making a new crown will not fix the problem, as it is not the crown’s fault it keeps coming out.

Crowns need strong cement and to be properly shaped to stay in place. If your dentist over-prepared your crown and shaped it too much, no cement will be able to hold it in.

It’s likely your crown was prepared with inadequate retention form in mind. You will need a crown specialist to properly shape your tooth and cement it in place. Look for a dentist with experience in dental crowns, or another CEREC dentist in the area.

This blog post is brought to you by Gilbert CEREC crown provider, Dr. Matthew Roper, of Vista Dorada Dental.

 

My Porcelain Crown Keeps Falling Off!

Hi there,

I was issued a same-day crown, which I thought would be fast and convienent, but in the year since I’ve gotten it, it has fallen out a handle of times!

I went to see a different dentist, who changed the setting of my crown, and gave me a zirconia crown. However, even this one has fallen out! He says that a different porcelain crown will stay in better.

Is this dentist right? Should I go to another dentist? Should I give CEREC another try? What should I do?

Nancy, from Trenton, New Jersey

 

Hi there Nancy,

When CEREC same-day crowns are done correctly, they will stay put permanently. CEREC crowns are made from a milled block of ceramic, but no matter what material you use to make a crown, it does not affect whether the crown will stay in.

There are two things that affect whether crowns will stay in. One this is the type of bonding used to cement the tooth into your mouth. The stronger the cement, the better the hold. The other factor is the shape of the tooth. The tooth needs a little bit of tapering to look natural, but the more taper done to the tooth, the harder it will be to bond it into your mouth. It is likely that your tooth was not tapered properly, which is why it keeps falling off.

You should go see a dentist in the area that specialized in crowns. It is very uncommon for crowns to fall out as many times as you have experienced.

This blog post is brought to you by Gilbert CEREC crown provider, Dr. Matthew Roper, of Vista Dorada Dental.

 

 

Is My Pain Caused by my CEREC Crown?

Hello there,

I had three CEREC crowns done on my back teeth recently. I was pleased with how convenient getting the CEREC crowns was, but since then, I’ve had a lot of pain when chewing. Eating anything crunchy or chewy causing a bolt of pain, as though a nerve is exposed or something. My dentist has shaved down some of the crown. He says the pain I feel is from how I grind my food when I chew. Is that the case? I’ve tried being more careful when I eat, but the pain I feel makes me nervous during meals.

Richard from Amityville, New York

 

Dear Richard,

There are a few reasons that can cause a new crown to hurt. One reason may be that the crown is too high, so the rest of your teeth hit it first when you bite into something. The second reason is that the tooth under the crown may be infected. The infection can cause inflammation in the jaw, causing constant jolts of pain when biting or chewing.

Your pain is unlikely to be caused by how you chew your food, as you did not have this problem prior to the crown. Also, CEREC crowns are supposed to fit exactly to your mouth’s specifications, as they are milled to fit your teeth precisely.

Since your dentist has tried to grind down the crown, your pain is not likely to be caused by hitting too high on the crown. You will need to find out if you have an infection, and where it is in your mouth. An X-ray will be needed, and you may want to seek a second opinion if you do not trust your current dentist’s skills.

This blog post is brought to you by Gilbert CEREC crown provider, Dr. Matt Roper, of Vista Dorada Dental.

 

 

Is My CEREC Crown Causing My Sensitivity?

Hi,

My dentist recommended a CEREC crown to replace one of my teeth. This tooth has had issues to sensitivity to hot and cold, and I thought getting a crown would solve this problem. My dentist did not think I needed a root canal. However, after getting my CEREC crown, I’m still having a lot of sensitivity and discomfort. My dentist said to wait a month or so my mouth to get used to the crown. In the meantime, I’ve experienced sharp, throbbing jaw pain. I have had to medicate it with pain killers for a few weeks. I’ve had the crown for over a month, but it feels nothing like the other porcelain crowns I have. Am I correct in thinking the CEREC crown the source of my pain?  And what should I do?

Thank you,

Magnus, from Alberta, Canada

 

Hi Magnus,

Your issue is not likely caused by the CEREC crown, but rather the tooth itself. Tooth sensitivity to hot and cold is caused by irritation, and getting a crown can cause more irritation. Other options instead of a crown would include removing any current fillings or decay, and then filled the tooth with a bonding material to create a new core. If the new core did not reduce or eliminate the pain, then an x-ray and root canal may be needed.

CEREC crowns are more likely to fit better than traditional porcelain crowns, as they are milled by a computer based on a digital scan of your mouth. However, any crown you put over a sensitive tooth is unlikely to stop the issue.

When a tooth is infected, it will often feel worse before it feels better. If it suddenly starts to feel better, that means the pulp inside of your tooth has died, and a root canal is needed to clear it out.

Your best option is to get a second opinion about whether you need a root canal. You don’t need to go back to your same dentist who made the crown.

This blog is brought to you by Gilbert CEREC provider, Dr. Matthew Roper, of Vistadorada Dental.

My CEREC Crown Doesn’t Feel Right

Hello,
I recently broke one of my crowns. I wanted to get it replaced ASAP, so I opted for a same-day CEREC crown.

My new CEREC crown feels too thick and doesn’t fit right.  Even after my dentist filed it down, it still isn’t fitting properly. None of my other crowns ever felt like this. I don’t think it’s going to get any better. I thought CEREC was the way to go, but now I’m regretting getting one. Is my crown salvageable? Or should I scrap it?

Thank you,

-Adrian, Tallahassee, Florida

Hi Adrian,

Thank you for your message. Unfortunately, it sounds like your dentist just wasn’t that comfortable using the CEREC software; if they had been, your problem should have been avoided. CEREC crowns are made using a high-tech machine. This machine’s software scans the tooth prior to milling the crown from ceramic. The result is a strong, long-lasting ceramic crown, so it’s disappointing to hear you had such a bad experience.

Even without using your previous crown or original tooth as a baseline, your dentist should have been able to properly guide the machine to create a crown contoured to your gums. If the crown doesn’t fit right at the gum line, food can get trapped underneath it, and that can lead to gum disease.

Crowns are designed to fit so seamlessly in your gums that you would not notice them. Ill-fitting crowns can cause you to bite your lip, cheeks, or tongue, especially while you sleep. Aside from being painful and annoying, this biting and chewing could lead to the growth of a tumor.

I’m glad you tried to take care of this problem, as it can become more serious. However, now that the crown is cemented in your mouth, it is likely too late to salvage it. Your best bet is to ask your dentist to remove the crown. If you want another CEREC crown, find a more experienced cosmetic dentist. Otherwise, have your dentist send the crown to a dental lab to be remade. A new, properly-fitting crown will feel so much better than what you have now.

This blog post is brought to you by Gilbert CEREC crown provider, Dr. Matthew Roper.

What is a cerec crown?

If you are in need of a crown, but haven’t considered a CEREC crown, or are unsure of what they are, it’s important to take time to understand the science behind them, and why they are exceptional.

What is a CEREC Crown?

Many dental offices have technology which enables them to provide “computer-assisted design-computer-assisted manufacture”, or CAD-CAM crowns. CEREC is the company that is most known for this technology. This type of crown is created by a computer to perfectly fit your tooth, which prevents the need for the lab involvement in manufacturing the crown.

This technology allows the all-ceramic crown to be made while you wait, thus there is no need for a second appointment or temporary crown.

Facts About CEREC Crowns

  1. No single brand of same-day crowns. Though many people ask for same-day crowns by asking for CEREC crowns, this is an brand of same-day crowns, similar to Zoom Whitening, which is a brand of teeth whitening, but there is not a single brand of teeth whitening. CEREC means “Chairside Economical Restoration of Esthetic Ceramics”, but is not the only brand of same-day crowns. Often, the brand will use the phrase “same-day crowns”, or “crowns-in-day,” but these phrases are part of the marketing for the brand. However, the overall idea is the same with all restorations which take place in one dental visit. The office uses CAD/CAM technology to create it.
  2. CEREC crowns are billed the same as traditional crowns. Many people think the CEREC crown costs more than a traditional one. However, the opposite is true. For billing purposes, all dental procedures have billing codes. The billing code is the same for a CEREC crown and a traditional crown, therefore they cannot be billed any differently.
  3. They’re high-tech. CAD/CAM means a computer assists in the design. The program takes a picture of your mouth and plots out every detail. The measurements are exact. Then, the crowns are carved out by a machine in the office, with each new tooth starting out as a piece of material, oftentimes composite, zirconia, ceramic, or acrylic polymer, which is the same base for traditional crowns.

When operated and placed by an experienced cosmetic dentist, CAD/CAM crowns are a quick and efficient way to improve your smile, while maintaining a natural look and feel.

This article is provided by the office of Gilbert CEREC Crown provider, Dr. Matthew Roper.\