Tag Archives: Triazolam

Why Won’t Novocain Make Me Numb?

Hi,

I need a root canal on two front teeth on my lower jaw. Despite an infection and nerve damage, my dentist cannot get these teeth numb enough for a root canal. He did over 5 injections in my gums and even used a numbing paste, but it still wasn’t enough! He didn’t charge me, but I’m tired of living off pain killers. I need this root canal, but can’t unless I get numb. What can I do?

Miranda, from Mexico

 

Hi Miranda,

Your problem sounds like it’s related to dental anxiety. Research has shown that each time the tooth fails to get numb, anxiety increases substantially. Anxiety counteracts novocain; the higher your anxiety, the more difficult it is to numb your mouth.

Unfortunately, your dentist did not understand the correlation between increased anxiety and the need for more novocain. The dentist needs to write you a script for anti-anxiety medication. You will be instructed to take the medication before your appointment, about 30 minutes to an hour before. No matter the medication, you will need someone to take you to and from the appointment.

Another option is to find a sedation dentist that offers nitrous oxide. The difference between taking anti-anxiety medication prior to your appointment or getting nitrous oxide is that nitrous oxide will wear off shortly after the appointment. Gentle dentists offer sedation dentistry, as they understand how anxiety-inducing going to the dentist can be.

If your dentist does not offer sedation dentistry, try to find one, and hopefully under their guidance, you can be numb enough to finally get your root canal.

This blog post is brought to you by Gilbert sedation dentist, Dr. Matthew Roper, of Vista Dorada Dental. Dr. Roper offers both nitrous oxide sedation or a prescription for Triazolam for dental anxiety.

 

Can You Get Sick from Dental Sedation?

Hi,

I started seeing a gentle dentist for my dental anxiety. Sedation is supposed to calm your nerves, but I’m worried about getting it at my upcoming dentist’s appointment. I’ve heard it causes nausea, and the painkillers you get afterwards can cause drowsiness. Those two side-effects mixed together is a recipe for disaster. I’ve never had any adverse reactions to medications before, but I’m still worried. Is choking on your own vomit a risk after dental sedation? Or am I overthinking this?

Samira, Sterling, Colorado

 

Hi there Samira,

There are different levels of sedation and medication a dentist can provide.

The first is nitrous oxide, Also known as laughing gas. This is the sedation of choice for gentle dentists, because it works fast and wears off quickly afterwards, before you even leave the office. You may experience some nausea afterwards, but not necessarily vomiting. Most procedures using nitrous are relatively short, but the longer you are under sedation, however, the amount of nausea you may experience increases. To reduce this risk, don’t eat before your appointment.

The second is oral conscious sedation (OCS): This method uses nitrous oxide and an oral medication (like a sedative, anti-anxiety medication, or anti-histamine) prescribed by your dentist. The type of medication prescribed will depend on your dentist’s personal preference and which one best suits your needs; for instance, at Dr. Roper’s office, he prescribes Triazolam, a safe method of oral sedation.

It’s also recommended you have someone take you to your appointment and check in with you for a few hours after the appointment. Again, to combat nausea, your dentist will schedule you for a morning appointment, and instruct you to not eat the night before or morning of your appointment.¬†Even with this stronger sedation, no cases of asphyxiation during sleep have occurred, so please do not worry.

In summation, nausea is a common side-effect of sedation, but vomiting is not. Talk to your doctor about your fears, and they should be able to give you advice on how to minimize your experience with side-effects.

This blog post is brought to you by Gilbert sedation dentist, Dr. Matthew Roper.