Can You Get Sick from Dental Sedation?

Hi,

I started seeing a gentle dentist for my dental anxiety. Sedation is supposed to calm your nerves, but I’m worried about getting it at my upcoming dentist’s appointment. I’ve heard it causes nausea, and the painkillers you get afterwards can cause drowsiness. Those two side-effects mixed together is a recipe for disaster. I’ve never had any adverse reactions to medications before, but I’m still worried. Is choking on your own vomit a risk after dental sedation? Or am I overthinking this?

Samira, Sterling, Colorado

 

Hi there Samira,

There are different levels of sedation and medication a dentist can provide.

The first is nitrous oxide, Also known as laughing gas. This is the sedation of choice for gentle dentists, because it works fast and wears off quickly afterwards, before you even leave the office. You may experience some nausea afterwards, but not necessarily vomiting. Most procedures using nitrous are relatively short, but the longer you are under sedation, however, the amount of nausea you may experience increases. To reduce this risk, don’t eat before your appointment.

The second is oral conscious sedation (OCS): This method uses nitrous oxide and an oral medication (like a sedative, anti-anxiety medication, or anti-histamine) prescribed by your dentist. The type of medication prescribed will depend on your dentist’s personal preference and which one best suits your needs; for instance, at Dr. Roper’s office, he prescribes Triazolam, a safe method of oral sedation.

It’s also recommended you have someone take you to your appointment and check in with you for a few hours after the appointment. Again, to combat nausea, your dentist will schedule you for a morning appointment, and instruct you to not eat the night before or morning of your appointment.¬†Even with this stronger sedation, no cases of asphyxiation during sleep have occurred, so please do not worry.

In summation, nausea is a common side-effect of sedation, but vomiting is not. Talk to your doctor about your fears, and they should be able to give you advice on how to minimize your experience with side-effects.

This blog post is brought to you by Gilbert sedation dentist, Dr. Matthew Roper.

My CEREC Crown Doesn’t Feel Right

Hello,
I recently broke one of my crowns. I wanted to get it replaced ASAP, so I opted for a same-day CEREC crown.

My new CEREC crown feels too thick and doesn’t fit right.¬† Even after my dentist filed it down, it still isn’t fitting properly. None of my other crowns ever felt like this. I don’t think it’s going to get any better. I thought CEREC was the way to go, but now I’m regretting getting one. Is my crown salvageable? Or should I scrap it?

Thank you,

-Adrian, Tallahassee, Florida

Hi Adrian,

Thank you for your message. Unfortunately, it sounds like your dentist just wasn’t that comfortable using the CEREC software; if they had been, your problem should have been avoided. CEREC crowns are made using a high-tech machine. This machine’s software scans the tooth prior to milling the crown from ceramic. The result is a strong, long-lasting ceramic crown, so it’s disappointing to hear you had such a bad experience.

Even without using your previous crown or original tooth as a baseline, your dentist should have been able to properly guide the machine to create a crown contoured to your gums. If the crown doesn’t fit right at the gum line, food can get trapped underneath it, and that can lead to gum disease.

Crowns are designed to fit so seamlessly in your gums that you would not notice them. Ill-fitting crowns can cause you to bite your lip, cheeks, or tongue, especially while you sleep. Aside from being painful and annoying, this biting and chewing could lead to the growth of a tumor.

I’m glad you tried to take care of this problem, as it can become more serious. However, now that the crown is cemented in your mouth, it is likely too late to salvage it. Your best bet is to ask your dentist to remove the crown. If you want another CEREC crown, find a more experienced cosmetic dentist. Otherwise, have your dentist send the crown to a dental lab to be remade. A new, properly-fitting crown will feel so much better than what you have now.

This blog post is brought to you by Gilbert CEREC crown provider, Dr. Matthew Roper.