What should I do if my CEREC crown broke?

Two weeks ago, I had a CEREC crown done. I was recently eating, when I felt something come loose in my mouth. I came to find out this crown had broken in half. The dentist offered to fix the crown free of charge. While I was thankful for this, I wanted to know why this happened. I want to be sure this was just a fluke circumstance and not an error made by the dentist.

Sincerely,
Randi

Dear Randi,

While this is quite rare, there are some things that may have hinted that something was “off”, like tooth pain, jaw pain, or if the tooth was connecting first when you bit down.

Another possibility is the way the material handled stress, though it is unlikely that this is the case. However, if this were the case, it is possible there was some sort of defect in the material before use, though this, too, is unlikely.

Another thought is if you grind or clench your teeth, this may be the cause. Each tooth has a different threshold in terms of the amount of force it can withstand. This is why some restorations my break, while others do not. If this occurs during the day, practicing relaxation exercises can help. If it’s taking place at night, a night guard will prevent the grinding.

The majority of crowns can handle this to an extent, so you can’t rule out the material used or a mistake made by the dentist. It’s worth having him redo the procedure. It would be good to see what he thinks is the cause. Dentists have restorations fail from time to time. So long as this is not the norm, and he wants to fix the issue, it sounds like you’re in good hands.

This post is brought to you by Gilbert CEREC provider Dr. Matt Roper.

Can I see a sedation dentist if I’m on medication?

I need to see a sedation dentist, but experience depression and anxiety, and am on several medications to manage them. Is this something that will prevent me from receiving sedation during my dental treatment?

Thank you,

Nikki

Dear Nikki,

There is not one specific medication used by all dentists. Each chooses his/her own sedation medications based on their dental experiences, philosophies, and the medical history of the patient. The only way to know which medication is used is to go directly to the sedation dentist who is treating you.

You will need to take a full list of your medications, including the amount and frequency, to your dentist. He or she will use this list to determine which medications are right for your dental treatment. If their typical treatment will conflict with your medication, the dentist should offer to find an alternative. If not, he or she should refer you to someone who can help.

If possible, you should also consider sending your medication list to the dental office in advance. The staff should be able to advise you if they are unable to treat you. Most likely, they will advise you to come in to discuss a treatment plan.

This article is brought to you by Gilbert sedation dentist, Dr. Matthew Roper.